On trial: Social Work Online & Border and Migration Studies Online

October 31, 2017 – 2:04 pm
ACULibrary

The Library has two new resources on trial in November.

Social Work Online trial active until 30 November 2017

This database pairs compelling documentaries with video lectures, client demonstrations, and relevant text content to illustrate the complex and challenging realities social work students will face as practitioners.

Border and Migration Studies Online trial active until 24 November

A research and learning-driven collection that explores and provides historical background on more than thirty key worldwide border areas from the 19th to the 21st century.

Check out these and other new and on trial resources via the Library A-Z Databases list.

Please have a look and let us know what you think by completing our feedback form.

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Free food at the Library during exams

October 31, 2017 – 9:30 am
ACULibrary

It’s a busy time of year, and we know you’ve been working hard. Reward yourself with free food at the Library during the exam period.

Each campus Library will have snacks available on select days. Find out dates and times for your campus below.

Ballarat:

A range of snack food and drinks will be available inside the Library.

Date Day Time
6 November Monday 2pm
7 November Tuesday 2pm
8 November Wednesday 10am
9 November Thursday 2pm
14 November Tuesday 10am
15 November Wednesday 10am
16 November Thursday 10am


Brisbane:

Snack food and cold drinks will be available inside the Library.

Date Day Time
6 November Monday 10:00am
9 November Thursday 10:00am
14 November Tuesday 10:00 am
16 November Thursday 10:00 am

 

Canberra:

Snacks and mini drinks will be available inside the Library.

Date Day Time
6 November Monday 10:30 AM
9 November Thursday 10:30 AM
14 November Tuesday 2:30 PM
15 November Wednesday 10:30 AM

 

Lollies will also be available on most days. If you want to take some extra time out to de-stress, there will also be ongoing access to a jigsaw puzzle.

 

Melbourne:

Healthy snacks, fruit, juice and water will be available at snack stations inside the Library.

Date Day Time
6 November Monday 10am-1pm
8 November Wednesday 10am-1pm
10 November Friday 10am-1pm
13 November Monday 10am-1pm
15 November Wednesday 10am-1pm
16 November Thursday 10am-1pm

 

North Sydney:

The Library will have lots of snacks including nuts, shapes and mini chocolates. Campus Ministry will also supply fruit inside the Library.

Date Day Time
8 November Wednesday 11:00am
9 November Thursday 11:00am
13 November Monday 11:00 am
15 November Wednesday 11:00 am

 

Lollies will be available on most days. Games including a chess board, UNO cards, a jigsaw and colouring pages are available if you want to take some extra time out to de-stress.

 

Strathfield:

The Library will be providing free pizza and cans of soft drink at the following times, in the outdoor shaded area near the Library:

Date Day Time
6 November Monday 11:15 AM
13 November Monday 11:15 AM

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Revise with past exam papers online via the Library.

October 30, 2017 – 10:39 am
ACULibrary

Exams are coming and it’s time to get studying. From past exams to study spaces, the Library is here to help.

Students studying in Melbourne Library

Being prepared is one of the best ways to manage stress and feel confident in the lead up to exams.

At the Library we have a range of services and resources available to help you do your best in your exams and beyond. Visit us in person or online to discover what the Library can do for you.

If you have any questions, contact us24/7 chat operates throughout semester and we’re always happy to help.

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Open in order to make information freely available

October 29, 2017 – 9:00 am
ACULibrary

This interview is part of a series celebrating Open Access Week 23-29 October, 2017.

Interview with:

Dr David Opar
Lecturer, Exercise Science
Faculty of Health Sciences
Australian Catholic University (Melbourne)

How do you see open access reflecting the ACU mission?

I believe that Open Access supports the greater good as it allows any individual access to information. This could be clinicians working in allied health professions anywhere in the world, who would otherwise be unable to access this information. Allowing these individuals to continually update their knowledge should assist them in making better decisions with their patients.

Why did you choose to publish your research as open access?

I believe that freely available information and scientific literature should be a right for all people. The ability to access information should not be dictated by your level of education, socioeconomic status or status in society.

Find some of David’s open access publications in Research Bank researchbank.acu.edu.au

and on twitter @davidopar

  • “Impact of the Nordic hamstring and hip extension exercises on hamstring architecture and morphology: Implications for injury prevention”
  • “Impact of exercise selection on hamstring muscle activation”
  • “Eccentric knee flexor strength and risk of hamstring injuries in Rugby Union: A prospective study”

Watch the video below to learn more:

YouTube Preview Image

For more information on Open Access: library.acu.edu.au/openaccess

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On trial: Proquest History Vault

October 27, 2017 – 1:51 pm
ACULibrary

The Library has three new trials active until 22 November 2017

Proquest History Vault: Civil Rights and the Black Freedom Struggle in the 20th Century

Proquest History Vault: Slavery and the Law

Proquest History Vault: Southern Life and African American History 1775-1915: Plantation records

These databases consist of manuscript and archival collections digitized in partnership and from a wide variety of archival institutions. Major collection areas in History Vault focus on Black Studies, Women’s Studies, International Relations, American Politics and Society, and Labor Studies. This trial will take users to the home page of History Vault. Access specific modules of content via featured modules section of the home page or the Browse tab at the top of the home page.

Check out these and other new and on trial resources via the Library A-Z Databases list.

Please have a look and let us know what you think by completing our feedback form.

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Open in order to share research findings widely

October 27, 2017 – 9:00 am
ACULibrary

This interview is part of a series celebrating Open Access Week 23-29 October, 2017.

Interview with:

Dr Baljinder K. Sahdra
Senior lecturer
Deputy Head, Positive Psychology Research Program, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education
Australian Catholic University (Sydney)

How do you see open access reflecting the ACU mission?

It promotes the common good by making specialist knowledge available to non-specialists masses – especially non-academics who don’t have institutional or university access to academic articles.

Have you demonstrated open access to your students?

Yes. HDR (higher degree research) students can find using open access daunting, especially when their data is also made available to the public. But sharing through open access helps them build confidence in their methods and reach out a wider audience.

Find an example of Baljinder’s work in an open access journal online:

“Using Genetic Algorithms in a Large Nationally Representative American Sample to Abbreviate the Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire”

(Journal: Frontiers in Psychology)

View more of Baljinder’s open access publications in Research Bank researchbank.acu.edu.au

OAshare

Learn more about Open Access: library.acu.edu.au/openaccess

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Open in order to advance and share scholarship

October 26, 2017 – 9:00 am
ACULibrary

This interview is part of a series celebrating Open Access Week 23-29 October, 2017.

Interview with:

Leonard Baatiema
Public Health PhD Candidate
Faculty of Health Sciences
Australian Catholic University (North Sydney)

How do you think open access assists peoples in need?
I believe people in need especially those from resource-poor settings stand to benefit from open access in diverse ways. Two key issues are worthy of note.

First, these are places where the populace have worst health outcomes compared to developed countries and thus clinicians should have uninhibited access to new knowledge of patient care. This can only be made fully possible with open access. With the wave of support for evidence-based practice in healthcare, open access will make it possible for health practitioners to ensure decisions about patients care are based on the best scientific evidence. However, this can be compromised severely by limited access to knowledge published in biomedical and health sciences journals.

Secondly, students from the developing world often lack behind partly due to limited access to educational resources and information. Because most educational institutions do not subscribe to paid journals due to cost factors, students’ access to current and best scientific research in such journals is impeded. This is an issue that can be overcome if such barriers were removed to ensure open access to all research outputs globally without constricted learning environments.

In sum, I regard open access as a vehicle to equitable access to quality healthcare as well as distribution of knowledge and exchange of scholarship. Scientific advancements must be for the public benefit and not just the rich and so greater access and dissemination of scientific knowledge will help address the needs of everyone. On the basis of these reasons, we should all say YES to open access to promote greater exchange of scholarship and knowledge advancement.

Why did you choose to publish your research as open access?

I am an avid advocate of open access publication, a position premised on one key imperative: to increase uptake of my research works and translated into meaningful health polices and clinical practice to improve health outcomes.

In line this, I believe that for any piece of research information to make meaningful impact, its content must be widely accessible without any impediment. However, we are still in a ‘’global research order’’ where only about a third of journals offer open access. Even with this, cost of accessing open access publication or publishing in open access journals further limits publication in such journals or limits access to the content of some research outputs, a situation which undermines knowledge translation, sharing and advancement of scholarship worldwide.

Such cost and access issues must be tackled in order to optimise the full potentials of research outputs to advance knowledge, improve human lives and make the planet much more habitable. Of course the potential reasons for the publication and access costs in open access journals include editing and publication costs of research outputs. Governments, donors, research institutions and other bodies must begin to support open access with some earmarked budgetary allocations to support such cost issues. This will inevitably promote knowledge exchange and promotion of scholarly works.

Find some of Leonard’s publications online in open access journals:

  • “Barriers to evidence-based acute stroke care in Ghana: a qualitative study on the perspectives of stroke care professionals” (Journal: BMJ Open)
  • “Health professionals’ views on the barriers and enablers to evidence-based practice for acute stroke care: a systematic review” (Journal: Implementation Science)
  • “Towards best practice in acute stroke care in Ghana: a survey of hospital services” (Journal: Implementation Science)

Learn more about Open Access: library.acu.edu.au/openaccess

Quote: we should all say YES to open access to promote greater exchange of scholarship and knowledge advancement.

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Open in order to share knowledge more widely

October 25, 2017 – 9:00 am
ACULibrary

This interview is part of a series celebrating Open Access Week 23-29 October, 2017.

Interview with:

Dr Michael Cole
Senior lecturer, exercise science
Faculty of Health Sciences
Australian Catholic University (Brisbane)

Why did you choose to publish your research as open access?
Publishing in open access journals benefits our research group and the wider research community in a number of ways. Specifically, by making our research available to anyone with an internet connection, we are able to improve the visibility of our research team and more widely promote the work that we are doing. Furthermore, and perhaps more importantly, publishing in open access journals gives our research the best possible chance of making a difference to the world, as our scholarly outputs are more accessible to scientists, clinicians and patients who would otherwise not have the means to access this information.

What do you see as the benefits of sharing research and resources using open access?

As a team who works with clinicians and clinical patient populations, it is fundamentally important that the findings of our research are visible and accessible to all whom we are seeking to assist. Living in a developed country, we are fortunate that many of our clinicians will have access to subscription-only journals, but the vast majority of patients, carers and general practitioners will not. By publishing the key findings of our research in open access journals, we remove the financial barriers that restrict the transfer of knowledge and provide all clinicians with the same capacity to care for their patients. Furthermore, by allowing patients to access the latest scientific research, we can empower these individuals to tackle their condition head on and reassure them that we are working towards a better future.

Find some of Michael’s open access publications in Research Bank
researchbank.acu.edu.au

  • “Wearable Sensor Use for Assessing Standing Balance and Walking Stability in People with Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review”
  • “Executive function and postural instability in people with Parkinson’s disease”

Open in order to share knowledge

Learn more about Open Access: library.acu.edu.au/openaccess

Open in order to share data

October 24, 2017 – 9:00 am
ACULibrary

This interview is part of a series celebrating Open Access Week 23-29 October, 2017.

Interview with:

Dr Jean Burke
Senior Lecturer, Social Work
Faculty of Health Sciences
Australian Catholic University (Strathfield)

How do you think open access assists peoples in need?

I think open access data-sets can be accessed by students and researchers, including those in low-resourced countries, and analysed to add to evidence and knowledge to assist people in need. My own open access data is about an important human rights issue affecting a marginalised group in Africa.

Why did you choose to publish your research as open access?

I am very keen to see data being shared and used responsibly for maximum benefit. There is so much work put into collecting, organising and storing data, it is great for data to get an opportunity to be valuable into the future by being accessed and used by others.

Find Jean’s open access dataset in Research Bank

researchbank.acu.edu.au

Media reporting on persons with Albinism in Tanzania

The data set is a list of news media reports from the United Republic of Tanzania about people with albinism from between 2008 and 2014.

Learn more about Open Access: library.acu.edu.au/openaccess

oaquote_Dr Jean Burke

 

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On trial: Music Online: The Complete Music and Dance

October 23, 2017 – 1:57 pm
ACULibrary

The Library has a new resource on trial until 20 November 2017.

Music Online: The Complete Music and Dance 

Music and Dance Online delivers the largest, most diverse catalog of music content in the world for students, scholars, and patrons of the arts. The multimedia resource features works from thousands of respected partners, covers hundreds of genres from alternative to zydeco and from alternative dance to operatic arias, and encompasses a wide range of content formats – including scores, reference, and high definition audio and video.

Check out this and other new and on trial resources via the Library A-Z Databases list.

Please have a look and let us know what you think by completing our feedback form.

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