Archive for August, 2012

Publishers’ surpluses should further scholarship, say academics

Friday, August 31st, 2012

Only a fifth of humanities and social science academics regard it as acceptable for academic publishers to make a profit that is not reinvested in their disciplines. This is among the findings of a survey of nearly 700 academics in the fields carried out as part of a research project into ...

Rewriting the Journal

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

With faculty balking at the high price of traditional academic journals, can other digital publishing options get traction? This spring, more than 12,000 science, math, and humanities researchers signed an online petition against the academic publisher Elsevier, pledging not to publish in, referee for, or edit Elsevier journals. The protest, sometimes ...

SPARC and World Bank to Co-sponsor OA Week 2012 Kickoff Event on 10/22

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

Washington, DC SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and the World Bank have announced they will co-sponsor the kickoff event for Open Access Week 2012 on Monday October 22nd in Washington, DC. The live event will take place at the state of the art World Bank facilities ...

Urgent Need to Revise the New RCUK Open Access Policy

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Many thanks to Peter Suber for providing further information about the open access (OA) policy recommendations of the Finch Committee and of Research Councils UK (RCUK), and the close relationship between them, based on an interview with Mark Thorley, convenor of the RCUK Research Outputs Network (RON). Peter makes no value ...

Using Social Media for Research

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Today nearly a Billion people use Facebook, and more than 500 million use Twitter to connect, share and interact with one another. YouTube receives more than 4 Billion video views per day, millions of people blog, and there are than more than 14 million articles on Wikipedia. Social Media today ...

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) for Institutional Repositories Webinar Recording Now Available

Monday, August 27th, 2012

This webinar provided SEO techniques for improving the indexing ratios of institutional repositories in Google Scholar. More emphasis is being placed on assessment and measurement of university outputs. Institutional repositories have the potential to increase citation rates of authors which, in turn, can affect university rankings. However, the possibility of doing ...

Articles: Ensuring Open Access for Publicly Funded Research; Going for Gold?

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Ensuring Open Access for Publicly Funded Research : Peter Suber "What matters first is to use the tools we have to drive open access for the benefit of researchers and taxpayers…. To do that on a global scale, every research funding agency, public or private, and every university, should require green ...

Ten recommendations for libraries to get started with research data management

Monday, August 27th, 2012

PDF available of Final report of the LIBER working group on E-Science / Research Data Management. From the Report :- Introduction LIBER installed the ‘E-Science working group’ in 2010 to investigate the role libraries can and should play in the field of E-Science. The group decided to focus on research data as it ...

Mendeley’s Open API Approach Is On Course To Disrupt Academic Publishing

Friday, August 24th, 2012

Science and academia have to date been a little slower to react to the vast changes going on in the business world as we move to the cloud, big data and third-party app ecosystems. Most academic online networks remain locked up by academic publishers with expensive licensing agreements for universities. ...

The long tail of academic publishing and why that isn’t a bad thing

Friday, August 24th, 2012

Universities are foolish to focus on academic superstars at the expense of staff that expand the ‘long tail’ of research. David Glance argues that increasing the numbers of academics who can publish and encouraging collaboration are better fixes than increasing the number of superstars. In 2004, Wired Editor Chris Anderson wrote ...