Ten Years after Budapest Open Access Initiative New Recommendations Released (SPARC)

20/09/2012 – 11:32 am
Tony McCall

Scientists, Foundations, Libraries, Universities, and Advocates Unite and Issue New Recommendations to Make Research Freely Available to All Online
WASHINGTON — In response to the growing demand to make research free and available to anyone with a computer and an internet connection, a diverse coalition today issued new guidelines that could usher in huge advances in the sciences, medicine, and health.

The recommendations were developed by leaders of the Open Access movement, which has worked for the past decade to provide the public with unrestricted, free access to scholarly research—much of which is publicly funded. Making the research publicly available to everyone—free of charge and without most copyright and licensing restrictions—will accelerate scientific research efforts and allow authors to reach a larger number of readers.

“The reasons to remove restrictions as far as possible are to share knowledge and accelerate research. Knowledge has always been a public good in a theoretical sense. Open Access makes it a public good in practice,” said professor Peter Suber, director of the Open Access Project at Harvard University and a senior researcher at SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition).

More at:-

http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/BOAI-Releases-Recommendations.shtml

source: SPARC (12/9/12)

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  1. One Response to “Ten Years after Budapest Open Access Initiative New Recommendations Released (SPARC)”

  2. Unless **9 words** are removed from the new RCUK OA policy, it is in direct contradiction with the very first item of the new BOAI-10-Recommendations for institutions.

    RCUK OA POLICY IS IN DIRECT CONTRADICTION WITH BOAI-10

    RCUK Draft OA Policy:

    3. Research Council Expectations of Researchers

    …Peer reviewed research papers which result from research that is wholly or partially funded by the Research Councils:

    1. must be published in journals which are compliant with Research Council policy on Open Access (see section 4)….

    4. Compliance of Journals

    The Research Councils will continue to support a mixed approach to Open Access. The Research Councils will recognise a journal as being compliant with their policy on Open Access if:

    1. The journal provides via its own website immediate and unrestricted access to the publisher’s final version of the paper (the Version of Record), and allows immediate deposit of the Version of Record in other repositories without restriction on re-use. This may involve payment of an ‘Article Processing Charge’ (APC) to the publisher. The CC-BY license should be used in this case.

    Or

    2. **Where a publisher does not offer option 1 above,** the journal must allow deposit of Accepted Manuscripts that include all changes resulting from peer review (but not necessarily incorporating the publisher’s formatting) in other repositories, without restrictions on non-commercial re-use and within a defined period. In this option no ‘Article Processing Charge’ will be payable to the publisher. Research Councils will accept a delay of no more than six months between on-line publication and a research paper becoming Open Access, except in the case of research papers arising from research funded by the AHRC and the ESRC where the maximum embargo period is 12 months.

    BOAI-10 OA Policy Recommendations for Institutions and Funders:

    1. On policy

    1.1. Every institution of higher education should have a policy assuring that peer-reviewed versions of all future scholarly articles by faculty members are deposited in the institution’s designated repository…

    Deposits should be made as early as possible, ideally at the time of acceptance, and no later than the date of formal publication.

    University policies *should respect faculty freedom to submit new work to the journals of their choice.* [emphasis added]

    University policies *should encourage but not require publication in OA journals* [emphasis added] …

    1.3. Every research funding agency, public or private, should have a policy assuring that peer-reviewed versions of all future scholarly articles reporting funded research are deposited in a suitable repository and made OA as soon as practicable.

    Deposits should be made as early as possible, ideally at the time of acceptance, and no later than the date of formal publication…

    By Stevan Harnad on Sep 21, 2012

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