Archive for October, 2012

How to get ‘Open Access’ into your publishing contract

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Negotiating a publishing contract can be difficult at the best of times. However, now that grant funding bodies such as the NHMRC are making it a requirement that resulting research publications be made publically available on open access, the negotiations around the publishing contract becomes even more important. To make the ...

An Open Data Manifesto

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

The Denton Declaration Introduction On May 22, 2012 at the University of North Texas, a group of technologists and librarians, scholars and researchers, university administrators, and other stakeholders gathered to discuss and articulate best practices and emerging trends in research data management. This declaration bridges the converging interests of these stakeholders ...

Quality indicators for new open access journals?

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Last week a handful of Dutch science actors (list below) organized a two-day Colloquium on Quality indicators for young (OA) journals. The colloquium discussed two indicators for new journals which covered the quality of the editors and the quality of the peer review respectively. The idea is that more than a ...

Research project into delivery of Information Literacy and Digital Scholarship

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

SCONUL (Society for College, National and University Libraries) and RIN (Research Information Network) are funding a year-long research project into delivery of Information Literacy and Digital Scholarship. There are two strands to the project. The first strand, co-ordinated by Research Information Network (RIN) on behalf of Research Information and Digital ...

British Library leads the way for sharing research data in the UK as five major institutions sign up to DataCite

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Five major research centres have expanded their commitment to make data more accessible through the British Library’s DataCite service, a global initiative which addresses the problem of how to find, access and re-use the results of research. The Archaeology Data Service, the UK Data Archive, the Natural Environment Research Council, ...

The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability (2012)

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

http://www.scribd.com/doc/111482370/COAR-s-Current-State-of-Open-Access-Repository-Interoperability-2012 The above report provides an overview of the current interoperability landscape in terms of the types of services that are now possible because of recent research and development efforts from throughout the Open Access community, and it presents interoperability initiatives in connection to these services. The intended audience includes institutions and ...

Why Green OA Needs To Come Before Gold OA: A Reply to Jan Velterop

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Jan Velterop wrote: (1) Stevan trades off expected speed of achieving OA against quality of the resulting OA. It's his right to do that. I just point out that that's what it is. That's my right. He calls it 'deprecating green OA'; I prefer to call it ...

Thomson Reuters Tackles Open Access Datasets With Data Citation Index

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

This month, Thomson Reuters began a soft launch of its new Data Citation Index, which is intended as “a comprehensive view of scholarly research bringing research data into the same arena as the published literature it supports. In combination with other resources available on the Web of Knowledge platform, researchers ...

Open Access: credit where credit is due

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

The monetary incentive for author-pays journals is towards accepting as many papers as possible, which obiously conflicts with the reputational incentive of only accepting "good" papers. Amongst the many "books that you absolutely have to read" for scientists is Bruno Latour's Laboratory Life (which is basically his PhD thesis). In this ...

Progress and Policies Reach a Pivitol Point as We Observe OA Week

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

One of the many joys of OA Week is the opportunity to reflect on the movement’s progress. It has been a watershed year for Open Access advocates as evidenced by the surge of momentum since last year. Just this week a new study published in BMC Medicine shows that ...