How to get ‘Open Access’ into your publishing contract

31/10/2012 – 1:43 pm
Tony McCall

Negotiating a publishing contract can be difficult at the best of times. However, now that grant funding bodies such as the NHMRC are making it a requirement that resulting research publications be made publically available on open access, the negotiations around the publishing contract becomes even more important.

To make the potential negotiation process a little simpler the University of Sydney Library, in consultation with the Office of General Counsel, have developed an Addendum Generator which creates the addendum for you.

All you need to do is to complete the four fields on the form and the ‘generator’ will create the text. Then sign the form and add it to the original contract.

http://news.library.usyd.edu.au/?p=966&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-get-open-access-into-your-publishing-contract

author: Sten Christensen
source: University of Sydney – Library News (31/10/12)

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  1. One Response to “How to get ‘Open Access’ into your publishing contract”

  2. IT’S FINE TO TRY TO NEGOTIATE RIGHTS RETENTION — BUT DEPOSIT YOUR REFEREED FINAL DRAFT IN YOUR INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY FIRST. IN ANY CASE.

    Sale, A., Couture, M., Rodrigues, E., Carr, L. and Harnad, S. (2012) Open Access Mandates and the “Fair Dealing” Button. In: Dynamic Fair Dealing: Creating Canadian Culture Online (Rosemary J. Coombe & Darren Wershler, Eds.) http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/18511/

    We describe the “Fair Dealing Button,” a feature designed for authors who have deposited their papers in an Open Access Institutional Repository but have deposited them as “Closed Access” (meaning only the metadata are visible and retrievable, not the full eprint) rather than Open Access. The Button allows individual users to request and authors to provide a single eprint via semi-automated email. The purpose of the Button is to tide over research usage needs during any publisher embargo on Open Access and, more importantly, to make it possible for institutions to adopt the “Immediate-Deposit/Optional-Access” Mandate, without exceptions or opt-outs, instead of a mandate that allows delayed deposit or deposit waivers, depending on publisher permissions or embargoes (or no mandate at all). This is only “Almost-Open Access,” but in facilitating exception-free immediate-deposit mandates it will accelerate the advent of universal Open Access.

    By Stevan Harnad on Oct 31, 2012

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