Citation Index

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

A citation index is an index of citations between publications, allowing the user to easily discern which later documents cite which earlier documents. The first citation indices were legal citators such as Shepard's Citations (1873). In 1960, Eugene Garfield's Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) introduced the first citation index for papers ...

Open Access increases citation? A brief overview of two reports

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Last week I have published a post about visibility and citations in Open Access. The post was referring to the results of two separate reports related to the subject. As the question of visibility and citations in OA journals and books remains valid, being a subject of intense debate in ...

Altmetric It Bookmarklet

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

I have been using the Altmetric It Bookmarklet myself for a while now, and more recently as a really useful and quick tool to demonstrate to researchers the importance of thinking "outside the impact factor" and traditional citation metrics. Talking about twitter and social networking tools is all well and ...

Research Trends – Big Data

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Research Trends Issue 30 - September 2012 Editorial: Special Issue on Big Data Research Trends is proud to present this Special Issue on the topic of Big Data. Big Data refers to various forms of large information sets that require special computational platforms in order to be analyzed. This issue looks at the ...

Twitter, peer review and altmetrics: the future of research impact assessment

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

"No one can read everything. We rely on filters to make sense of the scholarly literature, but the narrow, traditional filters are being swamped. However, the growth of new, online scholarly tools allows us to make new filters; these altmetrics reflect the broad, rapid impact of scholarship in this burgeoning ...

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no

Friday, September 21st, 2012

One of the reasons science librarians prefer subscription-based databases (ie SciFinder or Web of Science) or those offered as a service of the government (ie PubMed) is the nonstandard behavior of Google Scholar when compared to those resources. Google Scholar is not a bibliographic index, it is a search engine. ...

Scholarometer: A Social Framework for Analyzing Impact across Disciplines

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Abstract : The use of quantitative metrics to gauge the impact of scholarly publications, authors, and disciplines is predicated on the availability of reliable usage and annotation data. Citation and download counts are widely available from digital libraries. However, current annotation systems rely on proprietary labels, refer to journals but ...

Impact factor: researchers should define the metrics that matter to them

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The impact factor assumes that the most cited articles are the most influential, but influence is only one aspect of importance ..... One of the challenges faced by research funders – both public and private – is how to maximise the amount of work being done on important problems, without institutionalising ...

Academia.edu Adds Analytics To Bring Transparency To How Research Spreads

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Far away from Silicon Valley is another echo chamber in the Ivory Tower, except there’s very little transparency there about how content and ideas spread. Academia.edu, a social network for researchers, just unveiled an analytics dashboard that’s meant to help scientists and other academics understand how their work is being read ...

Taking the Impact Factor seriously is similar to taking creationism, homeopathy or divining seriously

Friday, August 17th, 2012

There is no evidence that journal rank has any persuasive predictive property for any measure of scientific quality. Every scientist who is not aware of the unscientific nature of the Impact Factor should ask themselves if they are in the right profession, writes Bjoern Brembs. I wasn’t planning to write ...