Researchers opt to limit uses of open-access publications

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Academics are — slowly — adopting the view that publicly funded research should be made freely available. But data released yesterday suggest that, given the choice, even researchers who publish in open-access journals want to place restrictions on how their papers can be re-used — for example, sold by others ...

A simple definition for open access: a proposal to open the discussion

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

This post proposes a shift from the detailed BBB definition of open access to Peter Suber's brief definition, as follows: Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions (from Suber's Open Access Overview). Rationale In my dissertation, I map and analyze ...

More publishers move towards CC-BY licence for OA articles

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Each year, Open Access Week signals a wealth of access-related announcements from companies and organisations involved in scholarly publishing. This year many of the announcements focused on licensing conditions. At first glance, open access (OA) can seem like a single, unifying concept. However, the reality is different. Even within the gold ...

Why CC-BY?

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

At OASPA, one of the criteria for membership is that a publisher must use a liberal license that encourages the reuse and distribution of content. We strongly encourage (but currently do not require) the use of the CC-BY license wherever possible. Given recent moves in the UK by the ...

Help put the open in Open Data and Open Bibliography

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Public consultation on open data in journals launched ..... From BioMed Central: We propose to change the copyright license in open access journals to make published data available for sharing, integration and reuse without legal restrictions, for the benefit of science. If implemented this would mean authors in the future would ...

Mendeley’s Open API Approach Is On Course To Disrupt Academic Publishing

Friday, August 24th, 2012

Science and academia have to date been a little slower to react to the vast changes going on in the business world as we move to the cloud, big data and third-party app ecosystems. Most academic online networks remain locked up by academic publishers with expensive licensing agreements for universities. ...

CC license version 4.0: Helping meet the needs of open data publishers and users

Monday, August 20th, 2012

Over the last few months, Creative Commons has been working on the next version of its license suite, version 4.0. The goals of version 4.0 are wide-ranging, but the overall objective is clear: update the licenses so they are considerably more robust, yet easy to understand and use, for both ...

Wiley Moves Towards Broader Open Access Licence

Friday, August 17th, 2012

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced revised licensing arrangements for proprietary journals published under the Wiley Open Access program. The journals will adopt the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence which allows commercial use of published articles. The Wiley Open Access portfolio also includes journals published with society partners, many of ...

Wiley to change journal licensing ‘immediately’

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

John Wiley & Sons is changing the way it licenses journals published under its Open Access programme "immediately" in response to recent government proposals to make some papers free to access by 2014. The academic publisher will now use a Creative Commons Attribution license, which will allow commercial use of articles ...

Finch Report an Important Step Towards UK Open Access Policy but Significant Questions Remain on Implementation

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

'PLoS welcomes the Finch report recommendation to adopt open access of publicly funded research in the UK. The report raises important questions of implementation, particularly on licensing and transitional funding arrangements, that must be resolved in detail. We look forward to working with other stakeholders committed to Minister David Willetts’ vision of ...