The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability (2012)

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

http://www.scribd.com/doc/111482370/COAR-s-Current-State-of-Open-Access-Repository-Interoperability-2012 The above report provides an overview of the current interoperability landscape in terms of the types of services that are now possible because of recent research and development efforts from throughout the Open Access community, and it presents interoperability initiatives in connection to these services. The intended audience includes institutions and ...

Thomson Reuters Tackles Open Access Datasets With Data Citation Index

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

This month, Thomson Reuters began a soft launch of its new Data Citation Index, which is intended as “a comprehensive view of scholarly research bringing research data into the same arena as the published literature it supports. In combination with other resources available on the Web of Knowledge platform, researchers ...

The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability (2012)

Friday, October 26th, 2012

The Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) is pleased to announce publication of the report, The Current State of Open Access Repository Interoperability (2012). The report provides an overview of the current interoperability landscape in terms of the types of services that are now possible because of recent research and ...

Setting the Digital Agenda for the Memory of the World

Friday, October 12th, 2012

“This heritage is fragile; together we must protect it”. This was the message of UNESCO’s Director-General, Ms Irina Bokova, to the participants in the international conference “Memory of the World in the Digital Age: Digitization and Preservation”, which concluded its work on Friday, 28 September. More than 500 experts from ...

The Finch Report and RCUK Open Access policy: How can libraries respond?

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Libraries have always been advocates of Open Access (OA), providing repository services to collect, share and preserve open access versions of research papers. The Finch Report and the new RCUK OA policy mark a transformation to the way in which research is published and made available in the UK. Making ...

Hitachi invents quartz glass storage capable of preserving data for millions of years

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Hitachi has managed to develop a long-term data storage solution it claims can preserve information for hundreds of millions of years. The technology, announced earlier this week in Tokyo, utilizes a high-precision laser to embed dots of binary code across a tiny piece of quartz glass. From there, an optical ...

Trust in Digital Preservation: A European Framework for Audit and Certification of Digital Repositories

Monday, September 24th, 2012

New Report From APARSEN (Alliance Permanent Access to the Records of Science in Europe Network). Trust is fundamental to the working of society – in particular when it comes to unfamiliar digitally encoded information, especially when it has passed through several hands over a long period of ...

Working on borrowed time?

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Librarians fear redundancy as open access alters role of academic collections. A report offers a sobering analysis of the implications for academic libraries - and academic librarians - of the "shift to more open-access scholarly content". Released last week, Moving towards an Open Access Future: The Role of Academic Libraries summarises a ...

Help Define Levels for Digital Preservation: Request for Public Comments

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Over the last few months a team of librarians, archivists, curators, engineers and other technologists in the NDSA have been working to draft a simple chart to help prioritize digital preservation work. After iteratively developing this document and workshopping it at Digital Preservation 2012 we are excited to publicly share ...

Digital history could be lost forever due to changing devices, says expert

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Historians will be facing a black hole when it comes to studying the 20th and 21st centuries because much of our digital history is stored on technology that no longer have devices to read them, experts claim. The information stored on everything from floppy disks to CDs, mobile phones to cameras ...