The UK’s 6% Factor and the “Gold Trumps Green” Principle: Perverse Effects

Friday, September 14th, 2012

If the Finch/RCUK OA Policy is not revised, worldwide publishers' subscription revenues stand to increase by 6% (the UK percentage of all annual peer-reviewed research published) over and above what they already are, at the expense of the UK taxpayer and UK research, in exchange for Gold OA to UK ...

Key Questions for Open Access Policy in the UK

Friday, September 14th, 2012

While recent policy developments have made huge strides for open access publishing, there is still great uncertainty over how the transition will play out. Stephen Curry distills the key questions that have emerged over translating open access policy into practice. This article originally appeared on Stephen Curry’s personal blog, ‘Reciprocal Space’. It’s ...

RSC ahead of the game in supporting transition to Open Access

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Yet again the RSC has demonstrated its foresight in the world of scientific publishing. To support the transition to Open Access (OA), the RSC recently pledged £1 million to aid UK chemical science researchers to publish 'Open Access' papers in RSC journals. This gesture has now been followed by the UK ...

Open access, Primo Central and addressing accessibility to open access articles in hybrid journals

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The recommendations of the UK’s recent Finch report, looking into potential models for the expansion of access to the published findings of research, sparked interesting discussions about the value and philosophy of gold vs. green open access publishing. The Finch report recommends a model whereby research findings, particularly when research ...

UK government re-allocates £10 million of science budget to push for open access

Monday, September 10th, 2012

British science minister David Willetts today announced that he had found £10 million (US$16 million) from assorted crumbs of unused science budget, which he would give to research-intensive universities to help make their research findings freely available. Willetts called the cash ‘extra investment’, a strange term for what government spokespersons said ...

A Push Grows Abroad for Open Access to Publicly Financed Research

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Researchers, publishers, and librarians have spent a lot of this year firing up the longstanding debate over access to published research. You've probably heard the big questions: Who gets to see the results of work the public helps pay for, when should they get to see it, and who's going ...

A hybrid gold open access and a Chesire cat’s grin: How to repair the new open access policy of RCUK

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

Unintended consequences of RCUK policy mean that if academics want open access publishing, publishers are happy to sell it to them, writes Stevan Harnad. He argues that researchers should not have to choose gold publishing when green open access is available. Suppose you’re a subscription journal publisher. Offering a Hybrid (Subscription/Gold) ...

Articles: Ensuring Open Access for Publicly Funded Research; Going for Gold?

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Ensuring Open Access for Publicly Funded Research : Peter Suber "What matters first is to use the tools we have to drive open access for the benefit of researchers and taxpayers…. To do that on a global scale, every research funding agency, public or private, and every university, should require green ...

SPARC Europe’s response to the Finch Report

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

A thumbs up for Open Access, but an expensive way of getting there SPARC Europe welcomes the UK Government’s positive interest in Open Access and the Finch report on expanding access to research publications. We are pleased that the issue has gained recognition for its importance and the benefits it can ...

Gold Open Access; academic publishing; research management systems; Elsevier; Finch Report

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

Following the Finch Report, the Government’s endorsement of its recommendations and the statement of policy from RCUK, Gold Open Access (OA) and its implications are at the forefront of many minds. To refresh memories: Green OA is where a pre- or post-print of a traditionally published article is placed in a ...