Open-access journals: a perspective from within

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

There’s an ongoing debate in the world of academic publishing about whether the public should be allowed open access to research publications we all pay for in the first place. “If we are paying for this research, aren’t we entitled to scrutinise the results?” That’s the call-to-arms I’m hearing at the moment, ...

Twitter, peer review and altmetrics: the future of research impact assessment

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

"No one can read everything. We rely on filters to make sense of the scholarly literature, but the narrow, traditional filters are being swamped. However, the growth of new, online scholarly tools allows us to make new filters; these altmetrics reflect the broad, rapid impact of scholarship in this burgeoning ...

‘Setting The Default To Open’: The Next Ten Years Of Open Access

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

As Techdirt has reported, open access (OA) is scoring more and more major wins currently. But the battle to gain free access to academic research has been a long one. One of the key moments was the launch of the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) ten years ago, which saw ...

Open access, Primo Central and addressing accessibility to open access articles in hybrid journals

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The recommendations of the UK’s recent Finch report, looking into potential models for the expansion of access to the published findings of research, sparked interesting discussions about the value and philosophy of gold vs. green open access publishing. The Finch report recommends a model whereby research findings, particularly when research ...

Impact factor: researchers should define the metrics that matter to them

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The impact factor assumes that the most cited articles are the most influential, but influence is only one aspect of importance ..... One of the challenges faced by research funders – both public and private – is how to maximise the amount of work being done on important problems, without institutionalising ...

Taking the Impact Factor seriously is similar to taking creationism, homeopathy or divining seriously

Friday, August 17th, 2012

There is no evidence that journal rank has any persuasive predictive property for any measure of scientific quality. Every scientist who is not aware of the unscientific nature of the Impact Factor should ask themselves if they are in the right profession, writes Bjoern Brembs. I wasn’t planning to write ...

Mendeley’s analytics dashboard set to speed up the academic ‘Impact Factor’

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

London-based startup Mendeley, the free reference manager and academic social network, has released the Institutional Edition of its new dashboard for research and impact analysis and signed up leading academic establishments along the way. Though many may consider academic papers to be released in a closed world for big thinkers, this ...

How journals manipulate the importance of research and one way to fix it

Friday, July 13th, 2012

'Our methods of rewarding research foster an incentive for journal editors to ‘game’ the system, and one in five researchers report being pressured to include citations from the prospective journal before their work is published. Curt Rice outlines how we can put an end to coercive citations. Over ...

The weakening relationship between the Impact Factor and papers’ citations in the digital age

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Abstract: Historically, papers have been physically bound to the journal in which they were published but in the electronic age papers are available individually, no longer tied to their respective journals. Hence, papers now can be read and cited based on their own merits, independently of the journal's physical availability, reputation, ...

There is a pathetic lack of functionality in scholarly publishing. We must end for-profit publishing and allow libraries to make available the works of their scholars for all

Friday, November 11th, 2011

"Publicly-funded science is suffering but academia must embrace technology before it can deliver its full potential to scientists, policy-makers and the public. Björn Brembs argues that the sum made by for-profit publishers would be more than enough to establish a freely accessible infrastructure that ...