Scholarometer: A Social Framework for Analyzing Impact across Disciplines

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Abstract : The use of quantitative metrics to gauge the impact of scholarly publications, authors, and disciplines is predicated on the availability of reliable usage and annotation data. Citation and download counts are widely available from digital libraries. However, current annotation systems rely on proprietary labels, refer to journals but ...

Taking the Impact Factor seriously is similar to taking creationism, homeopathy or divining seriously

Friday, August 17th, 2012

There is no evidence that journal rank has any persuasive predictive property for any measure of scientific quality. Every scientist who is not aware of the unscientific nature of the Impact Factor should ask themselves if they are in the right profession, writes Bjoern Brembs. I wasn’t planning to write ...

Open access means business: Pay-to-publish approaching same impact factor as subscription journals

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

Open access journal BMC Medicine has added scientific rigor to the debate about open access research, by publishing an article which compares the scientific impact of open access with traditional subscription publishing and has found that both of these publishing business models produce high quality peer reviewed articles. The debate about ...

How journals manipulate the importance of research and one way to fix it

Friday, July 13th, 2012

'Our methods of rewarding research foster an incentive for journal editors to ‘game’ the system, and one in five researchers report being pressured to include citations from the prospective journal before their work is published. Curt Rice outlines how we can put an end to coercive citations. Over ...

There is a pathetic lack of functionality in scholarly publishing. We must end for-profit publishing and allow libraries to make available the works of their scholars for all

Friday, November 11th, 2011

"Publicly-funded science is suffering but academia must embrace technology before it can deliver its full potential to scientists, policy-makers and the public. Björn Brembs argues that the sum made by for-profit publishers would be more than enough to establish a freely accessible infrastructure that ...

No more publish or be damned for social science academics

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

'SOCIAL sciences academics should take the lead in developing a metrics-based system for measuring research quality in their disciplines, if one were ever to be introduced, bibliometrician Linda Butler says. "It is important, if there are any moves towards metrics, for the disciplines to be fully involved from ...

Dropping ERA rankings ‘correct decision’: Ellen Hazelkorn

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

Source: The Australian, July 06, 2011 'Dropping rankings from journals for the next round of the Excellence in Research for Australia audit was the correct decision, according to a leading thinker on metrics in higher education. Ellen Hazelkorn, Dublin Institute of Technology's director of research and enterprise in ...

A smoother path awaits academics

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Source: The Australian, Higher Education 'RESEARCHERS submitting evidence of their performance in academic journals will find their paths smoother in the second round of the sector-wide quality audit, according to Australian Research Council chief exectuive Margaret Sheil. In a presentation to senior academics, Professor Sheil revisited the recent decision to ...

Arts & Humanities Journal Rankings

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

Source: the guardian 'European academics are outraged by a new attempt to categorise arts and humanities journals. When new lists categorising European arts and humanities journals were first published in 2007, UK academics were – to put in politely – incensed. We want "no part" in such a "dangerous ...

From where I sit – Bowl out the ‘Measurers’

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Source: Times Higher Education 'In the last days of May, the Australian government came to an unwontedly sensible conclusion in regard to its recently completed Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) exercise. It dropped the splitting of journals into four categories starting at A* and declining to ...