Open access: everyone has the right to knowledge

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Last week, we celebrated Open Access Week – an event aimed at bringing attention to this rapidly emerging form of scientific publication and its ethical imperatives. Traditionally, knowledge breakthroughs and scientific discoveries are shared through publication in academic journals. Peer-reviewed and highly competitive, careers are made and broken on the number ...

Open-access science: be careful what you wish for

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

In recent weeks we’ve seen a renewed push to introduce open access to science research publications. The concept is simple: research that is paid for by public funds should be made freely available, not only to other scientists, but also to the people who actually paid for the research: the tax-paying ...

Open-access journals: a perspective from within

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

There’s an ongoing debate in the world of academic publishing about whether the public should be allowed open access to research publications we all pay for in the first place. “If we are paying for this research, aren’t we entitled to scrutinise the results?” That’s the call-to-arms I’m hearing at the moment, ...

New analysis on factors associated with academics publishing more than others

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Motivation and the ability to network have a far greater impact on research productivity than age, gender, job satisfaction, managerial support or teaching load. That is the central conclusion of work by researchers from University College Dublin led by Jonathan Drennan, lecturer in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems. Drennan's ...

Twitter, peer review and altmetrics: the future of research impact assessment

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

"No one can read everything. We rely on filters to make sense of the scholarly literature, but the narrow, traditional filters are being swamped. However, the growth of new, online scholarly tools allows us to make new filters; these altmetrics reflect the broad, rapid impact of scholarship in this burgeoning ...

Want to Change Academic Publishing? Just Say No

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

When I became a professor, 20 years ago, I received a request from a woman who lived close to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where I taught: Could she come and talk to me about a set of interests she was developing, in the area of my own specialty in ...

Impact factor: researchers should define the metrics that matter to them

Monday, September 10th, 2012

The impact factor assumes that the most cited articles are the most influential, but influence is only one aspect of importance ..... One of the challenges faced by research funders – both public and private – is how to maximise the amount of work being done on important problems, without institutionalising ...

Supporting Public Access to Research Results

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

We posed the question of what services an academic library can best provide to support the NIH Public Access Policy. We approached the answer to this question through education, collaboration, and tool-building. As a result, over the last four years we have engaged over 1500 participants in discussions of public ...

What is this peer-review process anyway?

Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Let me begin with a digression. (Hey, we may as well start as we mean to go on). Citations in scientific writing are used for two very different reasons, but because the two cases have the same form we often confuse them. We may cite a work as an authority, to ...

Peer review is vital but its closed nature belongs to a bygone age. It’s time to open up

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Biases, deliberate delay, repeated rejection – peer review has its problems but it is a crucial part of research dissemination, writes Rebecca Lawrence, who explains that open publication of all good science followed by open peer review is the key to future publishing. Discontent with the traditional peer review system ...