Free-for-all – Open-access scientific publishing is gaining ground

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

At the beginning of April, Research Councils UK, a conduit through which the government transmits taxpayers’ money to academic researchers, changed the rules on how the results of studies it pays for are made public. From now on they will have to be published in journals that make them available ...

All Green-OA embargoes are iniquitous

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

We’ve seen a lot of arguments recently about the RCUK open-access policy and the length of embargoes that it allows on Green OA articles under various circumstances. When is it reasonable to insist on six months? When might publishers have cause to want to stretch it out to 24 months? ...

Open Confusion

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Catching up yesterday evening with the Times Higher, I found yet another article about the confusion generated by RCUK‘s plans for Open Access publishing. Apparently pressured by the powerful Publishers Association, RCUK has adopted the following “decision tree” to explain how its proposal will work. More at: http://telescoper.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/open-confusion/ author: source: In The Dark ...

Finch Acknowledges Open Access Could Harm Learned Societies

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

The adoption of open access (OA) in the UK continues to meet with challenges, months after the RCUK adopted the Finch Report recommendations and placed an April 2013 stipulation on research results being published via either Green or Gold OA. As the policy and its implications have sunk in, responses have ...

Is RCUK’s open-access cash a ‘reckless’ road to ruin?

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Research Councils UK's announcement of how it will allocate more than £100 million in block grants for open-access publishing has met with a lukewarm reception. The grants, which will be available from next April, are intended to help universities to meet the cost of making articles freely available under the "gold" ...

More publishers move towards CC-BY licence for OA articles

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Each year, Open Access Week signals a wealth of access-related announcements from companies and organisations involved in scholarly publishing. This year many of the announcements focused on licensing conditions. At first glance, open access (OA) can seem like a single, unifying concept. However, the reality is different. Even within the gold ...

Asia-Pacific perspectives on the impact of open access on librarians

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

Commentary from librarians in the Asia-Pacific region on the impact of open access :- To complement the previous post on SwetsBlog about open access (OA) and its actual and potential impact on librarians, we also asked some librarians in the Asia-Pacific region for their thoughts. We had comments from three librarians ...

The inexorable rise of open access scientific publishing

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Read all about it: academic publishing is changing faster than anyone has realised, according to a new study reported today in BMC Medicine. Before 2000 the vast majority of research papers were published in journals that could only be read by academics if they — or their university libraries — paid ...

The Finch Report and RCUK Open Access policy: How can libraries respond?

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Libraries have always been advocates of Open Access (OA), providing repository services to collect, share and preserve open access versions of research papers. The Finch Report and the new RCUK OA policy mark a transformation to the way in which research is published and made available in the UK. Making ...

Gold is good, but it’s not the only colour, RCUK says

Friday, October 5th, 2012

Research Councils UK is "staggered" by the widespread misunderstanding of its new open-access policy, which it insists is not "anti-green". The comments were made by Mark Thorley, chair of RCUK's Research Outputs Network, at a discussion event called Open Access: Going for Gold? that was held last week at Imperial College ...